Episode 1: 'As  above, so below'

Rufus Harrington is the consultant cognitive behavioural psychotherapist for SongPath, and has worked closely with us in cultivating our therapeutic walking trails and general practice.  He is the director of cognitive behavioural therapy studies at the University of Cumbria, a specialist in Hermetic Meditation – a western tradition of meditative practice – and the director of the newly founded WISER MIND Institute,teaching a psychology of integration.

Transcript 

Rufus Harrington:  

…and the fit with what Jess was trying to put together in terms of a SongPath, as this being a journey really of helping people journey through nature to come into better relationship also with themselves: that being a spiritual journey; that being a musical journey, but also being a psychological journey.

 

Jess Dandy:              

Rufus Harrington is the consultant cognitive behavioural psychotherapist for SongPath, and has worked closely with us in cultivating our therapeutic walking trails and general practice.  He is the director of cognitive behavioural therapy studies at the University of Cumbria, a specialist in Hermetic Meditation – a western tradition of meditative practice –and the director of the newly founded WISER MIND Institute, teaching a psychology of integration.  

 

Rufus Harrington: 

…if you’re looking at the kind of hallmarks of mental health, an ability to be flexible, to adapt to circumstances, engage with possibility, all of that’s another way of describing creativity; it’s another way of describing growth.  The only way you grow is to engage in some ways with what you don’t know; the only way you learn is by doing something new, and having a willingness to fail a bit on the line.

 

Jess Dandy:              

I’m Jess Dandy and this is PodPath, the SongPath Podcast, where conversations about mental health allow us to explore ways of connecting creatively and restoratively to ourselves, each other, and the world around us.  Today’s episode is the first part of a wonderfully far reaching conversation with Rufus Harrington.  

 

Jess:                

Welcome, Rufus to our first episode of the SongPath podcast!  Maybe you could start with telling us a little bit about your involvement in the SongPath initiative, what you've already done with us on our physical SongPaths, and what the therapeutic basis for a SongPath is.

 

Rufus:            

Well, it all started with being mugged by Jess; basically it's all her fault!  

 

Jess: 

Haha!

 

Rufus:

Jess knew me, knew of my interests and my work within both psychology and spirituality. And the fit with what Jess was trying to put together in terms of a SongPath; as this being a journey really of helping people journey through nature to come into better relationship also with themselves: that being a spiritual journey; that being a musical journey, but also being a psychological journey. And I think as we talked about this, Jess, it became more and more obvious that that sort of integration of music, psychology, spirituality, that the SongPath, in a way, is about learning to walk a more meaningful life. And to embody that, both in a place, on a day, to go through an experience of going through the real SongPath process, but also that underpinning that is a vision really of human beings just living in a better way: you know, deeper, more connected. And in a way I bring, I think, to the project the insights of modern psychology because I'm very much an evidence-based dyed in the wool cognitive behavioural therapist, but I was also trained in spiritual systems of meditation from a very young age, and to my mind the two things actually complement each other beautifully.

 

Jess:                

That's great – and you've mentioned the word “embody”, and I think that's something that we really explore at SongPath; it's this idea that together we bring our bodies on the journey and we have a conversation with our landscape, and in so doing, our bodies actually acquire a sense of definition in relation to the landscape, and I wonder whether you could talk about the notion of the connection to body and its therapeutic benefits within the field of modern psychology.

 

Rufus:            

Well, the magic word’s integration. To see mind and body as two things separate is a hugely bad mistake to make.  You know, the human mind, the human psyche, the body, are deeply all part of the same system.  And you know, on a very, very simple level, if you consume vast quantities of alcohol you will know that it has a wonderfully impactful,…mood changing effect, shall we say, on your mind.  And mind and body – they are brother and sister; they are all part of the same system.  And what we're doing on SongPath is acknowledging that, in a very practical way. And from the spiritual philosophies, there's a lovely saying: “As above, so below”, which is very much pointing to the fact that the higher mental faculties, the physical faculties, all of these things are deeply, deeply woven together, all part of the same experience.  And so when we walk the SongPath, we're walking the SongPath but at the same time, directing our attention to be aware of mind and body, the path that we're walking along; to develop a mindful relationship with the environment we're walking through: the physicality of earth, the path that we're walking on, but also that physicality of body, of actually being alive, noticing. It’s the daft thing, most people are just sort of existing, pottering through life because they’re busy paying the bills that kind of thing, and there's nothing wrong with that.  But some of our best moments in life is [sic] when we open our awareness and experience to what we're doing and actually become embodied in the moment, in the here and now, in the life; that we are living.  And SongPath is about getting into that state – I think.  

 

Jess:               

Absolutely – and I think we've talked a lot about this feeling of connectivity and the way in which it is an antidote to the disconnection of mental health conditions, and I wonder whether you could talk a little bit ­– you've referred to people maybe going through life in a way that is “existing”, but maybe you could go a little bit further and talk about how mental health conditions are generally characterised by disconnection and how that manifests itself in neuroscientific terms.

 

Rufus:            

Yeah, it’s fundamental. If you look at mental health disorders, they are all of them really different forms of disassociation, and what I mean by that is a disconnection from a part of your experience. You know, if you take a typical case with somebody who's been traumatised, somebody who's been through a horrible traumatic experience in their past or something more recent, typically that sets up a set of horrible feelings, memories that a person may not want to remember, to face.  And so, one way or another, they find a way to disconnect from that experience, which can be protective; it can help you in the short term to cope with that situation. It's a natural thing we do as human beings, but the problem is, if you get stuck in that mode, if you have to disconnect from what you're emotionally feeling, what your memory is trying to present to you, if you’ve got to get away from feelings in your body of anxiety that you really find difficult to cope with, more and more you start living in a way to avoid any feelings being set off.  You live in a way where you avoid different memories by distracting yourselves in different ways. Some memory or feeling comes to mind and you've just got to turn away from it. And what happens over time, you turn away from the experience of being alive; you end up in this very sort of what I call “uncomfortably numb” state, plagued by sort of spikes of anxiety, which intrude, which you are then always fighting with, and increasingly a person ends up fighting with themselves, their life energy being spent on avoiding their own experience.  And the bottom line of it, it’s terribly exhausting on the one hand, and typically people who have anxiety disorders become anxious, become exhausted, and that exhaustion really is the depression that they then start mostly having; that they've literally exhausted themselves trying to get away from themselves.  And if someone is trapped in that kind of cycle, it's very hard to get on with living a meaningful life.  And when I look at therapy, it really is a game of two halves: on the one hand, tame the symptoms, help the person reconnect, deal with the things that they’re avoiding, and once you've done that, the second half of therapy, which is in fact, the more important bit, get on with living – in a way, get back on the SongPath. That’s where we have to go. And so this notion of dissociation is right at the heart of any kind of psychological process.  Really psychotherapy is about integration, helping people to reconnect from [sic] themselves and to heal the wounds that perhaps traumas in their past have inflicted on them.

 

Jess:                

And so if somebody were to say, “Okay this is all very well, I love the idea of this”,

 

Rufus:            

Yep…

 

Jess                 

…what would their first step be? Because one thing that is lovely about SongPath is that it can take the form of a huge collective walk, as we saw last year, but if somebody maybe doesn't feel up to that, how might, in the comfort of your own home – and this is particularly topical at the moment; we're all being forced to look far closer to home for our own sense of connection and integration – so how might somebody create their own mini-SongPath?

 

Rufus:            

I work with a lot of clients online now, and so in a sense I have a window into their homes where they are dealing with the COVID-19 situation. And one thing that's coming across in that work is that people have had a chance to slow down; people have had a chance to kind of actually take a pause. Now it’s not true for everybody – some people [are] in very difficult situations – but for those in relatively okay circumstances, they've taken a pause, and instead of their attention being locked on work – getting up, get into work, get through the day, come home, sort the house out, feed the kids – there's a little bit more space and time, and the interesting thing is, once you’ve got a bit of space and time, and your attention is no longer locked into that kind of routine, you start moving into a state of mind more suitable for building a SongPath. Because a SongPath in a way starts with in a sense a simple question: “Well, who am I? What do I want? Who do I want to be? What do I want to do?” And that question so often gets lost in the chaos of just getting through the day, and doing what you’ve got to do. And so to just pause to begin with, and begin to just – those kind of dreams that perhaps you put aside because you’re busy – to begin to just ponder. It’s a little bit like when you're on holiday: you’ve been there for about a week; you’ve relaxed and suddenly all those wonderful things you'd like to do start coming to mind. That is the beginning of the SongPath. And instead of ignoring those ideas, the start point’s to begin playing with those ideas, actually listen to them.  You know, get the pad of paper out, write about them – let the crazy thoughts -ideas that you would like to explore some more. So that's the start point, and once you've got that start point, it's the golden thread to follow; if you like, the golden thread of the SongPath is instead of ignoring all that stuff, it’s [to] begin to follow that stuff and begin to unpack it a little bit.  And you know, in practical terms, here stuck in lockdown, it might be getting out Mr Google and going to it's [to search?] those particular kinds of things that you're interested in.  I've got a client at the moment, and he was stuck at home, bored out of his mind, and he suddenly discovered he's got two things he's always wanted to get into: blacksmithing and glass-blowing.  

 

Jess:                

Brilliant!

 

Rufus:            

This is a guy…you know, he spent a lot of time just doing all the normal stuff you’d do every day, but these are the two things ever since a kid those things would be lurking at the back of his mind.  And so what we’re doing now, he's actually doing an online course studying this, laying the foundations to actually get into it; and he’s ordering bits of kit to do it at home.  For him, this is opening up a world that he’s always wanted to get involved – but never placed his attention – in, that kind of space where some part of it wanted to go.  And you know, just having the lockdown out of sheer boredom to start with – and, you know, a little bit of guidance from myself – to sort of pay attention and to open his awareness in a different way, and he’s loving it.  It’s suddenly bringing meaning into his life and he's pursuing his path. I didn’t have the slightest idea this guy would like to discover blacksmithing. You know, it’s wonderfully bonkers, it's brilliant! But in lockdown he's discovered it and getting on with it, which is amazing. So it can be as simple as stopping to listen, pay attention to your dreams, and then start following your dreams. 

 

Jess:                

Yeah, I think this notion of listening is a really lovely one, isn't it, because we so often feel that in our immediate surroundings, and in our lives, that we have to sort of project some kind of preordained plan onto those surroundings and actually in the act of listening to our deep selves or even just listening to the landscape around us, there will be some sort of answer there and that we almost have become attuned to ourselves, attuned to some kind of deep message, and I think what you say also about the golden thread is a lovely one. In Greek mythology anything that is blessed is a woven object, and I suppose what I'm saying is that by following the thread you won't be left with a single thread; that things will actually start to interweave with that thread.  And that giving yourself space to allow for that inevitable interweaving is a lovely thing; that deep listening to yourself is not an assurance that you will remain alone on your SongPath; that there will be these threads that will start to converge with your own thread in unlikely and unexpected ways.  And that sort of very complex tapestry of life, and a life that is led with an open and kind curiosity to all possibilities in life: the possibilities of becoming a glass blower or a furniture maker, or even an opera singer are actually possibilities that don't keep you alone; they open you up to a complex web of what it actually means to be alive.  And as you said with this idea of “as above, so below”, it's been so wonderful, we mentioned in conversation a very long time ago the idea of the ‘Connectome Project’ that is being done within neuroscience and I would encourage everybody to look at those amazing images of the brain, which frankly look like a terrible mess: there are so many different networks and neurons that are all intersecting. Part of your work, Rufus and part of our work is to actually embrace the connectivity of life, which actually can look really messy at times, and I think that we've discussed that a lot: this idea of coming to terms with uncertainty; coming to terms with things that look unwieldy; the idea of misguidedly thinking that good mental health is having a sense of tight control over all areas of life, and life is very tidy and very ordered, and, “Don't come near me because I am hermetically sealed in my own hypercompetence!”. 

 

Rufus:            

Haha! Absolutely!

 

Jess:                

And I wonder whether you might talk about that idea of embracing the mess and the chaos of life which maybe seems chaotic but actually is appropriate to life, and reflects the way that our brains love to work, and thrive on working.

 

Rufus:            

It’s so fundamental because engagement with the mess, in some ways, is the opposite of dissociation because when you're fighting all your feelings, when you're fighting memories, feelings in your body, emotions you don't like, you get into control in a big way.  You know, you control what you do because that will make a difference to what gets triggered off; you control your body; you control your feelings; you control your memory; you control what you're thinking; you try to not have experience, and the problem with that, that basically just creates anxiety and depression – straightforwardly.  It looks like you're doing something to make yourself feel more in control, the irony is, it just makes you feel worse and worse and worse overtime. And when we look at the actual sort of science behind a lot of our understanding of anxiety, right in the middle of that is what we call an intolerance of uncertainty.  You know, very often people perhaps being brought up in situations where there was a lot of uncertainty and the way they coped with all that sort of difficulty was to then get into being perfectionists who had to control everything to feel safer.  There was a reason for it. But the problem with living, you can't control all of life.  You know, the reality of life is we can have some control but whether we like it or not life happens, stuff happens.  COVID-19 is the perfect example.  You know, here we are in a world where we would have never imagined this would happen, but it has, and we have to learn to change, to adapt, to work with the possibilities of this new situation, and, when a therapist is working with the patient in any kind of situation, really they are working to help the patient engage with uncertainty and transform it really into sort of looking at uncertainty in a different way; looking at uncertainty actually as possibility; that there are different opportunities. And if you're looking at the kind of hallmarks of mental health and ability to be flexible to adapt to circumstance, engage with possibility, all of that's another way of describing creativity; it's another way of describing growth.  The only way you grow is to engage in some ways with what you don't know; the only way you learn is by doing something new, and having a willingness to fail a bit on the line, like learning new skills and that kind of thing.  You’ve got to learn to play, grow, be flexible. That's the good stuff; all that fear of change and uncertainty is what keeps you in the prison cell of sort of symptoms of anxiety and depression.

 

Jess:                

I really identify with that notion of possibility.  And this idea that actually we can transform the received definitions of words: so this idea of “uncertainty” being a bad thing or “complexity” being a bad thing, or “knowing your place” being a bad thing, you know, and actually this idea of “possibility” is something that we really ran with at SongPath; this idea that – there’s a wonderful book by Stephen Graham called ‘The Gentle Art of Tramping’ in which he sort of extols the virtues of walking in a creative way, bringing the imaginary – or the imaginal as some people refer to it – back into the realm of reality: not being fixated on preconceived notions of approaching the world, and he talks in terms of, “When you walk through a valley or you lie prone on a hill, the door, which does not look like a door, opens.” And I think this idea of spatialising our notion of reality, of actually seeing the world in terms of doorways or gateways or windows into other possibilities, it brings me to another area of your interest, which is the Hermetic Tradition of Western Meditation.

 

Rufus:            

There is actually a very long history of a particular style of meditation taught in the West which has nicked and borrowed from all sorts of places, including the East, and no doubt that over huge periods of time there's been a wonderful interchange of ideas between East and West, and if you look at the deeper sides of the Eastern systems of meditation you'll find they’re not that different than some of the Western forms, but people tend to only get taught small parts of the Eastern system.  Now, the funny thing, this point you make about opening doors, and if there’s one thing that psychology, spirituality, the SongPath all have in common, it's about increasing awareness, and if you increase awareness you’re in a way opening a door between what you can see now and seeing something new, seeing something different, and what we know from psychology is that in a way we live locked into where our attention is focused, and one of the things I love is the modern neuroscience around the human brain as a predicting machine, and that kind of makes sense from a survival point of view, our greatest survival skill is trying to predict what will happen next.  But the problem is our predicting brain tends to rely very heavily on what we've experienced in the past. So you know, for example, in the past, as a kid, you get bitten by, you know, [a] scary dog. So as you're then walking down the street, and you see a dog, your brain throws up a prediction, “Dog is dangerous”, and you have a panic attack; you have a phobic response, and you run like hell in the opposite direction.  Now that's a good thing; it will keep you alive in the presence of scary, bitey dogs – great stuff – but it will prevent you from going, “Hang on a minute, that’s a nice dog, that’s a cute puppy.  I could train that dog, it might be able to go and hunt for me and do good stuff; it would be a lovely pet and a companion.” And what it looks like happened in the last 2 million years, we've developed a very different prefrontal cortex that is able not only to consider learning from the past, but is able much better to consider experience in the present.  It's the bit where we can, with practice, choose to focus our attention at will, not only on what’s happened behind us in our past, but can focus very much more on our experience in the present.  And harnessing that wonderful prefrontal cortex is really a lot of what we learn when we learn meditation. We learn to move our awareness: not only be a slave to our past, but embrace the experience that we're actually having in the present, as well.  And one of the lovely things, [as] you go and walk the SongPath, you've got a chance to open your awareness, move your attention around and start looking at new stuff and not be just stuck in the old stuff.  Going back to the holiday, when you're lying on the beach you kind of get out of the automatic pilot, living on the habits you developed through life and as you just lie there on the beach chilling and relaxing, your brain starts actually moving in different directions.  Now that very common experience people have on holiday is what you deliberately cultivate actually through meditation. You cultivate the ability to deliberately move your attention about: in some ways it's no more mysterious than that. It's about learning to be able to actually change the focus of your attention.  And this is hugely important in psychology because one of the great maintainers of psychological disorder is only ever focusing on what you've done wrong: re-living in your mind over and over again every conversation where you think he said the wrong thing, everything that you think you’ve done disastrously, and not paying attention to the fact that most days you get huge amounts of things right.  Every day you're coping with problems, having small successes, having positive interactions with other people, with a bit of luck.  But the problem is in the great tragedy of life is [that] people don't notice this because their attention is focused too much onto problems, what they've done wrong.  And through meditation, through psychological therapy, through walking the SongPath, you learn to begin deliberately focusing your attention in different ways.

 

Jess:                

And I think what you say about learning is a very important thing: that actually we’re very well practised; these pathways are very well trodden of self-flagellation, of evaluating things in a negative way. And your cognitive behavioural therapy and your meditation are practice tools: they emphasise repeated actions or exercises that actually forge these new pathways.  Because essentially if somebody wants to instantaneously stop thinking negatively about something it's not going to work, is it? It's this idea of cultivating something to such an extent that you have a sense of ‘learnt spontaneity’ with it, to sort of borrow the Confucian phrase. It’s this idea that these are habits, these are practices, these are disciplines that will take time to cultivate, and work to cultivate; this attentional redirection is not something that cannot be achieved with the flick of a wand. And also, when we talk about your meditative practices, one aspect of that is to think elementally about the world, and we’ve talked a lot about attentional redirection within SongPath, and the idea of possibility: allowing the mind to wander, thinking in a more expanded, positive, curious way.  But one thing that I suppose we haven't really talked about, which is central to SongPath, and I know is central to how you operate as well, is this idea of allowing nature to be our teacher, allowing us to re-form a connection to nature, and think elementally about the world.  So for example, within the Hermetic Western Tradition of Meditation, you use the four elements.  You bring back a sense of deep rootedness, and you distil the world into its purest forms of earth, air, water, and fire. And sometimes the people who practise that meditation can even use those allegorically for life.  And I suppose we take this idea that we engage very materially with the world: we see a tree; we smell the ocean, but then actually we can begin to play with that. Like you've said about this idea of allowing the mind to wander, allowing ourselves to play, and we can almost use that metaphorically within our own lives: we can kind of dissolve the boundary between our own bodies and the world around us, and we can see ourselves as forming part of a whole, and connect more, not just in a sort of anthropocentric way, but in – to steal a term from Adam Nicholson, an ecozoic way – an idea that actually we see everything around us as equal partners in living, and that we can have beautiful relationships and conversations with trees and plants and flowers and the sea, or even, Rufus Harrington, via BlueJeans;

 

Rufus:            

Haha!

 

Jess:                

…there’s no kind of differentiation, and people don't need to feel isolated even if there aren’t that many people around because there are doorways and possibilities in the most unlikely places.

 

Rufus:            

A few of the words you used there – about relationships, connectedness the elements – if you look at what all meditation systems are trying to achieve, it is connection: connection with self and the universe of which we’re are a part. There’s lovely old parts from the hermetic texts – there’s a body of texts called the Corpus Hermeticum – and there's a lovely piece in the Corpus Hermeticum: that, to paraphrase it slightly, it’s that if you can imagine within yourself all times, all places, that you're both young and old; if you can imagine that you are all these things – earth and water and air and fire – then you will truly come to an experience of the Divine.  That it's by opening yourself to experience, in a way, everything that you actually become, you grow, you develop a deeper sense of connection to both yourself and the rest of the universe. And if you look at the sort of the techniques of meditation that have been passed down to us, they are specific technologies developed to help people make connection. And the point you make that you can't just sort of swish a wand and magically it all happens in five seconds is quite right, because in order to develop the kind of awareness that is actually healthier, you've got to practise that awareness. It’s no different from any other skill in life: you want to learn to drive a car, you’ve got to take the lessons, practise the skills until it becomes automatic. And meditation is really just learning a set of skills to control and move attention in specific ways. Now the beautiful thing is that when people wanted to connect to the world, when they looked around them, they saw nature in all its beauty, and to teach ways to connect to that they said, “Okay, let's look at the world.  What’s it made of?” And some of the obvious stuff that it was made of was like the air you breathe, the fire – the warmth of life, the waters of the oceans, and of course the sheer physicality of earth, tree, mountain. And so symbolic representations of that world were designed into meditation systems.  And so in the Hermetic system, for example, you're taught to build a temple within your own psyche. And when I say temple, that is a place to go to build connections to the elements: of earth, and air, and fire and water; in doing so, connecting to those basic experiences of human life. And in learning specific techniques, you can foster that ability that when you are in your life and living, you naturally give into that experience of living.  And it takes practice. And the curious thing, modern psychology has borrowed hugely from the past. And you know, in cognitive behavioural therapy, we’re into thoughts, emotions, bodily sensations, and behaviour: things like this – it all sounds terribly scientific and technical.  But if you look to the old traditions of meditation, the air element was all about thoughts, the water element was all about emotions, the earth element much more about sort of bodily reactions and doing stuff, and the fire element very much again about fundamental motivation, energy, goal-seeking. The old systems – human beings have always been trying to make sense of human life – and all the traditions of meditation, modern systems of psychology actually have more in common than people often realise. But the beauty of the modern systems is that we do have the wonderful engine room of modern science, and we are developing new and wonderful understandings of the mind that were impossible to people a few hundred years ago because they didn't have brain scanners and all this clever kit we’ve got today.  But what they did know, and knew deeply, is that if you practise certain mental techniques: if you train yourself to connect with the air element, with your thoughts; if you train yourself to connect with the water element, your emotions; if you train yourself to do this systematically, you get better at it.  You develop the ability to move around between those different bits of your experience; to not avoid those different bits of your experience, and you also learn to move in and out of these different states of mind.  So you can go and explore your thoughts; you can go and explore your desires; you can go and explore your emotions, your body.  You can move your psyche between these different dimensions of your experience. And the better you get at that, the more connected you are to the broad base of your experience, the less dissociated you are from your experience. You learn to integrate those different bits of you into a more complete whole. And in the Western meditation system you're taught to build a temple to facilitate that integration process. And your trained in systematic exercises to practise building actually what would we’d now call the neural pathways into those parts of your brain. So literally by building this inner temple through a meditative process, what you're actually doing is building a more integrated brain. And again, if you come back to the neuro-scanners in the modern science: if you look at what happens, if people practise cognitive behavioural therapy methods, it changes the brain. You can see the pathways in the brain strengthening, changing, and we’ve got lovely, beautiful evidence to support this now. Psychotherapy is actually brain surgery – slightly less messy than doing it with a knife – but it's actually the same.  We've got this wonderful thing that we understand the brain that it is neuroplastic.  This concept of neuroplasticity is so important; that the brain all the way through the life cycle continues to change, to grow, and to modify, and depending on what you do with your brain, that's what shapes your brain. And so you can learn to shape your brain in new and exciting ways, and that's what meditation is all about: growing and changing.  It’s what psychotherapy’s all about: growing and changing.  And the growing and changing, of course, that's the SongPath, that's the journey.

 

Jess:                           

Sage words there from Rufus Harrington, SongPath’s cognitive behavioural psychotherapist. Join me next time, when Rufus and I continue our conversation, discussing his WISER MIND psychology of integration, the psychological geography of Carl Jung and E.M. Forster, and the surprisingly grounding force of kaleidoscopic perspectives in the practise of walking a labyrinth. In the meantime, stay connected, follow your thread, and keep walking the SongPath. 

Debussy, Reflets dans l'eau 

Listen to this episode's theme music in full: Debussy's Reflections in Water played by Martin Roscoe, and recorded by Bobby Williams on SongPath 2019. We were at Holy Trinity Bardsea, overlooking the "changeless changing" sea of the Leven Estuary. A song sleeps in all things, and this is a song of the estuary: evasive, playful, enticing, micro-currents abounding, form lost and found in the "salvaging brine". 

Golden Threads: Further Exploration

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